Session 5 - Wednesday 8th December


Roadblocks


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http://www.treknature.com/gallery/Africa/Botswana/photo4429.htm 

Coaching can be rewarding and difficult. You might encounter multiple roadblocks to your coaching programs. It will be helpful to know some strategies to analyze a problem.
In this activity, you will:
  • Learn how one coach used problem analysis to find a solution to a common coaching roadblock, “lack of time.”
  • Identify and analyze your own coaching roadblock.
  • Post a summary of your analysis to the Discussion Board, asking your colleagues for ideas or possible solutions.


Part A: Review the Sample Coaching Roadblock

  1. Open the handout.
  2. Review the steps for analyzing a problem.
  3. Review the analysis of the coaching roadblock, “time.”

Part B: Analyze Your Own Coaching Roadblock

  1. Identify some common roadblocks that are within your control. Possible topics might include time, support, or resources.
  2. Form groups of two to four participants based on a topic you would like to analyze.
  3. Use the handout to analyze your coaching roadblock with your group.

Part C: Use the Discussion Board

  1. Post a summary of your roadblock analysis to the Discussion Board. Include a request for ideas to solve the roadblock.
  2. Read and respond to at least two posts in the Coaching Roadblocks discussion. Choose a roadblock thread and offer some thoughtful information, approach, experience, or response to a peer’s post.
  3. Learn as much as possible about the Discussion Board.

Part D: Identify Possible Solutions

  1. In your groups, identify possible solutions to your roadblock.
  2. If you have enough information, identify a solution.
In this activity, you will:
  • Learn how one coach used problem analysis to find a solution to a common coaching roadblock, “lack of time.”
  • Identify and analyze your own coaching roadblock.
  • Post a summary of your analysis to the Discussion Board, asking your colleagues for ideas or possible solutions.


Reflect on Roles and Trust—Build Trust

Introduction

We understand that communication skills are important to building relationships, but you may have wondered why we have spent so much time talking about them in the Peer Coaching Program. Let's take a moment to discuss why.

Part A: Coaching and Trust

Characteristics of successful coaching include respect, cooperation, personal regard and trust. A dictionary might define trust as “reliance on the integrity, strength, ability, or truth of someone.” Previous coaches reported that they were able to do more collaboration activities as the year progressed. They felt this was due to an increased level of trust between the coach and collaborating teacher.
  • Why is trust critical to coaches?
  • What can coaches do to engender trust?
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Part B: Behaviors That Build Trust in the Workplace

  • Acts consistently and responsibly
  • Listens attentively to others' ideas
  • Uses communication skills to promote open discussion
  • Keeps promises and commitments
  • Is open minded
  • Advocates for others
  • Communicates accurately, openly and honestly
  • Treats others with respect
  • Displays compassion for others
  • Shows confidence in others' abilities
  • Respects others' time
  • Maintains a strong focus on teaching and learning
  • Strives to be knowledgeable
  • Is committed to personal success for self and others
  • Listens to and values what others say
  • Actively encourages others

Part C: Think-Pair-Share

  1. Spend a few minutes considering how the Trust Model and the Behaviors That Build Trust can help to answer these questions:
    • Why is trust critical to coaches?
    • What can coaches do to engender trust?


  1. Turn to a partner and share your ideas.

  1. Return to the larger group and share the suggestions you and your partner generated.

Part D: Building Trust: A Scenario

Review the following scenario and think about the ways this coach is trying to build trust with her collaborating teacher. Keeping in mind the list above, which behaviors that build trust does the coach demonstrate?
Scenario:
Ms. Kim works with a fourth grade team at her school. She always leaves her door open to encourage her colleagues to feel free to come in, and if she is busy she acknowledges their presence and arranges to meet them as soon as possible. She sends the team regular emails with Internet resources she feels they may be able to use and then encourages them to have candid conversations about what kinds of skills and support they may need to use these resources in their classrooms. She visits their classrooms often to model lessons, co-teach or just observe. The teachers feel comfortable with Ms. Kim because they know she has knowledge to share and will not be judgmental about their abilities.

Part E: Think About

Think about and jot down two or three ways you have built trust in your coaching as you have:
  • Recruited teachers
  • Coached teachers
  • Presented your coaching plan

Part F: Reflection

Using the discuss trust-building in your coaching efforts.

Part G: Debrief

  • What did you learn from this reflection? What ideas did you gain for your own coaching program?
  • How is increased attention to communication skills impacting your conversations?